Friday, October 31, 2008

Friday Confession

Oooh-la-la! OR Fancy (French) Seams...



The only special type of seam that I have ever used is a French seam.


I have never used a flat felled seam, or a bound seam, or a lapped seam...

In addition, I'm not particularly good at determining whether or not to use a French seam... I mean, I know that this is a good choice if the fabric is prone to fraying, but at times I've gotten in trouble using this seam early in my garment construction - it makes later seams difficult to complete. (The Italian chemise comes to mind...)

How about you? Which types of seams do you use regularly? How do you decide which to use at any given time?

10 comments:

AmeliaSews said...

I've been making shirts for my husband lately and so have been using flat felled seams alot.
I don't have a special felling foot to do them and I think they turn out pretty well - as long as I can remember which side I want to show and to take them slowly.

Really, I like any enclosed seam. I have used french seams mainly on sheer fabrics and I really like a hong kong finish for anything that will ravel or where the seam might show.

I just got a serger, which I will probably use for quick and easy seam finishes for my daughter's clothes and for knits, but for nicer pieces, I'll stick to the seams listed above- no matter how much quicker it would be to just serge.

Lisa Laree said...

I used French seams a lot before I got my serger, but now most of the time I do a simple serged finish on the seams. I don't even think about it.

For something special, though, I'll still pull out the French Seam technique. It's best for sheers, I think.

Lindsay T said...

I use French seams for silks and sheers. I am going to rely on Hong Kong finishes for unlined jackets. Haven't had the occasion yet for any of the others but am open to them.

Miss Linda said...

I'm still figuring out which seams are appropriate too, so you're not alone! I haven't tried French seams just yet. You did a beautiful job!! I just made a jacket using Hong Kong seams, and it turned out very well. I used Cecelia Podolak's book on sewing jackets that really helped me so very much!

Claire said...

The only fancy seam I've used is a french seam. Once time on an embroidered silk organza overskirt and the other times on silk shantung Christening dresses. Otherwise, I just use "normal" seams. ;o)

Summerset said...

I use all those seams, depending on the garment. French seams are a sentimental favorite, as my mother used them a lot in the clothes she made for me growing up. Sergers weren't available for home use at that time, and french seams were a sturdy and clean finish for children's clothing. I tend to use the seam finishes you mention in garments that are not lined and that I don't serge. Children's clothes I serge for durability, but blouses for myself and lightweight fabrics (silks, organzas, etc.) I will use the more time consuming finishing techniques.

Caity said...

I do use french seams a bit - but only on STRAIGHT seams! Right now I'm rushing to get a dress made for Tuesday so I'm doing plain seams with pinked edges and crossing my fingers that I won't end up with a ravelly mess!

Nancy W said...

I usually only use french seams on sheer fabrics. If the seams will show, like on an unlined jacket, I will use a hong kong finish or bind the seams with seam binding. For most garments, I just serge the seams. In some places, it's best just to stitch twice and pink (like on an arm/sleeve seam.) Sometimes it depends on the fabric, but in general, that's what I do.

Sarah said...

Hi! I am new to blogging and I love your page, so I couldn't resist replying when I saw... I have made several corsets for the theater, and we use flat-fell seams on them for strength. I use french seams quite a bit too, but I don't know that I have heard of a Hong Kong seam...

mamafitz said...

i actually use quite a few 'specialty' seams. french are used a lot, especially tiny ones on heirloom garments. i also use flat-felled, hong-kong, rolled/whipped, turned/edgestitched, and also just serged. many times i use them because i am too lazy to change my serger thread, and it'll be just as quick to make a pair of shorts with flat-felled seams.