Thursday, April 29, 2010

Friday Confession


Over the years I've seen 3 different ways to trim (or clip) curves. The first I ever learned is pictured above - cut little triangles into the seam allowance.

In one of the classes I've taken at the Original Sewing & Quilt Expo over the years (and I'm sorry I can't remember which one), the teacher showed us the technique of cutting diagonal slashes into the seam allowance - the trick being to cut each side of the seam allowance separately and from the opposite angle - so that the slashes oppose each other. (Hopefully that makes sense.)

Recently, I used a pattern that illustrated the curve slashing with a lot of little snips that were directly perpendicular to the seam.

So, how do you trim your curves? Do you think it matters much, or do you think any of these methods would be equally good?

12 comments:

sewducky said...

I actually french seam them, then steam them into submission on a ham and plenty of water and my iron. They lie well when I am done.

If I have to clip them, I do so on the curve and a little. I can always do more.

gwensews said...

On a tight curve, such as a collar, I pink the seams.

Ivalyn "Tee" Jones-Actie said...

I clip generously and pink if seam will be open (unlined).

Cole's Corner said...

I just use my pinking shears most of the time.
It's probably wrong... but it's fast and convenient.

Lady Jenn said...

All I do is cut the seam allowance back to about 1/8 inch.

I just finished a dress for my 4yo dd with a peter pan collar and took pictures for my blog.

I should be able to get it up this weekend.

And my curves are all perfectly round - with no dimples or straight edges.

Julie said...

I used to clip the seams like the picture above. BTW, the newest Threads mag (don't think it has hit stores yet) has a nice article about clipping the seams diagonally, opposing one another. I'm too lazy to clip anymore. I double-stitch the seams and then clip them really closely or steam them into submission.

Lisa Laree said...

On curves like the collar in the photo, I use my pinking shears to chunk out the triangles; on inner curves, like necklines, I will first trim the seams to about 1/4" and, if they are not quite submissive after that, I will use Louise Cutting's (I took her class too!) 'slash from different angles' technique...only, with that small of a seam allowance, it's really just a snip. And that's usually only necessary on very tight curves.

Anonymous said...

I have just started using only pinking shears. But I used to just trim the seams really close, or cut slits in the seams.

mamafitz said...

like most people have written, on sharp curves, i pink the seam. on a more gentle curve, i clip diagonally, each side separately, staggering the clips.

Faye Lewis said...

I trim/clip curves. I think it does matter, but there have been times that I clipped my stitching (uggggggg). I think both methods work equally; I prefer the little triangles, but rarely use them. What I hate is to have to trim the seam and then press the tiny thing open. My pinking shears are as old as the hills so I rarely use them, and keep putting off replacing them.

patsijean said...

I have used pinking shears fir curves for years; and, I often use them on straight seams, such as center front shirts. I still have, in great shape, the Wiss pinkers that I bought in the mid 70's.

Tamara said...

I get out my pinking shears and pink away!