Friday, April 2, 2010

Friday Confession


So, I use Fray Check, although I'm not crazy about it. Sometimes it's messy and I don't really like how it dries hard and lumpy. (Maybe I'm not using it correctly?) I just don't know anything better to use...

How about you? Do you use Fray Check, or some similar product? If not, how do you prevent unraveling, etc.?

17 comments:

Karin (the mrs) said...

I never use fray check. I never tried it even. Is it similar to some sort of glue or something?

I finish every edge of the fabric with a zig-zag to prevent it from fraying, or I use the overlock machine. I choose one of those two options, depending on how I want to finish the seams in the final product (sometimes I don't want the 'bulk' that the serged finish gives).

stitchywitch said...

Fray check dries less hard if you apply it with a toothpick or similar, rather than straight from the bottle. I don't like it much either, but occasionally I use it!

Julie said...

I use the head of a pin to apply, otherwise it is too much. Fray Check is kinda crappy though. I've heard that Fray Block by June Tailor is much better. I think I spotted some of this stuff in a JoAnn's once.

BConky said...

I use it sometimes but Fray Block works better. It's not so stiff feeling.

annaminiac said...

I used fray check on the hem of my wedding dress (for the organza overlay). I applied it very carefully with a toothpick and it worked perfectly. The silk organza would not have frayed very much anyway, but I wanted extra insurance without the heavy look of a hem. I can't think of many other situations where I would use fray check though.

meredithp said...

I too use Fray Check. I glob it out on something (old magazine or similar out of the trash) and apply a tiny dot with the pointy end of a pin, repeatedly if necessary. You cannot apply it directly from the bottle, no matter how careful you are.

I find it absolutely essential in buttons and buttonholes. Either before or after cutting the buttonhole open, I apply to the BACK of the buttonhole beads with aforementioned pin. Since I sew 99% of my buttons on with the sewing machine, I also apply Fray Check to the back of the stitches holding the button on. Keeps the stitches from unravelling.

I too have heard that Fray Block drys "less hard", but first I have to use up my Fray Check. It lasts a long time, unless you have an unfortunate accident!

gwensews said...

Occasionally, when I clip into a ravely fabric, for instance when seting in a godet, I will use a dot of Fray Check, applied with the head of a pin, in the seam allowance only.

CarlaF-in Atlanta said...

I use fray check but not very often and never directly on fabric after one bad experience. I put a few drops on scrap paper and use a pin or toothpick to apply it.

marysews said...

I use fray check after sewing buttons on by machine. After I tie off the threads, I use fray check on the reverse side of the fabric from the buttons to lock down the thread even more.

Anonymous said...

Mostly I use Fray Check on runners in panty hose, though I don't wear them very often any more.

Lois K

debbie said...

I use to use Fray Check for a few odds and ends. I didn't care much for the hardness of it.

A few years ago I switched to June Taylor Fray Block.
Much softer finish, but beware it's much thinner than Fray Check and it's easy to get some where you don't want it. Ask me how I know!

Faye Lewis said...

I do have a bottle but have never used it. Sort of scared of it.

Claire S. said...

Hmm, I was going to answer, and thought I'd better check my bottle when I saw the other comments about different types of fray check.

Mine is called Fray Stop 2 - It says imported by H.A. Kidd & Company. Bought at my local Fabricville and it was the only kind of fray check they had. I don't think I've ever seen actual Fray Check or Fray Block. Maybe not readily available in Canada ?

It has a tiny pinhole opening and I do use it directly from the bottle (without a problem so far, knock wood LOL).

So far I've only used it for buttonholes before I cut them. It doesn't dry too stiff and washes just fine.

patsijean said...

For me, Fray Check is a must for buttons and buttonholes. I use it on both sides of the buttonhole, from the bottle. I've never used a pin or toothpick. Fray Check is also great on the rolled hem of dinner napkins. I place a dot on each corner and let it dry, then clip the tail. I have also used it at the end of the slash for a sleeve placket, and in other assorted spots that might possibly fray because of too close clipping.

Summerset said...

I use it, but only in small spots, like godets, buttonholes and other small spaces that wouldn't be able to be serged or otherwise finished. I never use it for a finish for a long seam. I will use the head of a pin to apply it to small areas, otherwise, there will be too much. You can remove it with rubbing alcohol, but it may take multiple applications.

Cindy said...

Yes, I use it like the rest - on buttonholes. or when you need to keep something from fraying :) not used often but do have it hanging around just in case.

thought i better get over and answer this before the week went by :) never a dull moment!

rosa-draconum said...

I mostly do historical costuming, and I find fray check useful for pinking and slashes aka decorative cuts in the fabric. I apply it very carefully to just the edges of the cut. I've never had a problem with it even being visible.