Friday, September 24, 2010

Friday Confession




Sewing with a new-to-me brand of pattern (Amy Butler) was interesting in that her instructions and materials differed in several ways from the Big-4 pattern companies that I am used to. Last week I mentioned the darts. Her Lotus Cami pattern also called for SEW-IN interfacing.


Now, I took Home Economics in high school, approximately 30 years ago, when sew-in interfacing was the only option. When I started sewing again (almost 10 years ago), I discovered iron-on interfacing and immediately decided that it was a miracle and the best thing since sliced bread!


I thought I'd never go back to sew-in, but I did figure that she must have some reason for calling for it, and so I followed her instructions. It actually went in pretty easily and works well with this pattern - although that may be as much about the weight (heavier than the iron-in that I usually use) as anything else...


But it got me to wondering - are there times when sew-in is a better choice? Does it have any advantages over iron-in? What do you think? Do you ever use sew-in interfacing? If so, when and why?

14 comments:

CarlaF-in Atlanta said...

Great question. I've never used sew-in interfacing but after seeing the Golden Age of Couture exhibit and reading up on couture techniques, I'm willing to give it a try.

Ivalyn "Tee" Jones-Actie said...

I use sew-in interfacing when working with very fine light weight fabrics. I wouldn't dare press an adhesive to my expensive silks or organzas!

Stitchy Witch said...

I pretty much only use sew-in interfacing. I don't like the whole process of fusing, and I don't find it faster. Plus, I can't buy any nice fusibles locally, and I'm terrible to remember to order things ahead of time!

Julia said...

I use both. It depends on my fabric. Some fabrics seem to pucker when you adhere the iron-on kind. Sometimes I want a stiffer interfacing. I think either is fine, most of the time.

Summerset said...

I use both, but it depends on the project. If it is a more couture like project (since fusibles are not used in couture anyway, at least not to my knowledge), then I'll use a sew-in; if it is something trendy or for the children, I'll use a fusible.

Faye Lewis said...

I haven't used sew in in such a long time that I've forgotten how it affects fabric. I am, however planning to use it in the coat that I'm making now.

sewducky said...

I rarely use iron on interfacing. When I taught myself to sew 20 some odd years ago, my mother only HAD sew in, and she was what I used as a source of information for a long time. When I got to buying my own, I tried it and always have problems with it adhering without puckering.

Most of the time, I use organza or canvas for interfacing now. I like the body of it for most things, and I find that it fits in with what I sew the most. Medium weight fabrics I tend to use some 70s interfacing I have that I ADORE, but have no idea what the heck it is.

Usually, I don't want the crisper look, and I find that sewing it it makes the garment last much longer than iron on. I don't have to worry about the stuff coming unglued or twisting inside when it does.

meredithp said...

A hundred years ago, when I started sewing, there was something called "iron on" Pellon. And it literally was like iron, until it bubbled and shredded. Then I used sew in interfacing for a long time, until "fusibles" became widely available. I'll use a sew in when the fabric calls for it, but it's normally something like organza for a fabric that just can't be safely fused. I use fusibles now as often as possible. And Pellon (or other nonwovens)? I only use it for craft projects. Even so, my hands still shake when I take it to the cutting counter. So many bad memories! :-)

Nancy W. said...

The thing about iron on is that it is not dependable. Even with expensive interfacing, it sometimes bubbles after the garment has been washed and dried. I keep saying I'm going to use sew in on my next shirt collar, but haven't done it yet!

katherine h said...

I tend to only use sew-in when the pattern directs me to. The Vogue bag patterns usually suggest a heavy-weight sew-in, and I used a lighter weight sew-in for a Vogue Oscar de la Renta jacket pattern. I guess these days I tend to avoid facings which eliminates much of the need for interfacing.

meredithp said...

And just to follow up, I haven't had any issues with good quality fusibles (either tricot, weft, or woven) for at least 20 years. They don't bubble or peel off. And I don't use nonwoven fusibles, period.

Shannon Hillinger said...

I only use fusibles on knits and for machine embroidery projects. For most projects I strongly prefer sew in. Before I discovered that sew in interfacing I had a number of projects where I ironed the interfacing on wrong, so I really like that I can reposition sew in if I make a mistake. I also like that I don't get fusible on my iron anymore.

Sarah said...

I always use sew-in. When I want it fused , I just use a clear glue stick and glue it and then baste. This keeps the interfacing from moving while basting.

Becky said...

Most of the time I use fusible, but I've had bad experiences with that type screwing up sheerer and lightweight fabric (leaving air bubbles and developing ripples after laundering). So I'm more inclined now to use sew-in for that. I also keep hearing about using silk organza in place of sew-in interfacing for those lighter fabrics, and would love to give that a try!